If you’re a U.S permanent resident holding a green card, it is recommended that you renew your green card 6 months prior to its expiration date.  And here’s what you need to do:

eFile Form I-90 Online

You can renew or replace your green card quickly e-File via the internet.  Simply create an account on the USCIS website here to get the process started.

https://efiling.uscis.dhs.gov/efile/

Then you will have to mail all the required identification and supporting documents to the processing center at

Nebraska Service Center
Attn: E-Filed I-90 Application
PO Box 87090
Lincoln, NE 68502-7090

After all the necessary documentation have been received, you will have to wait for a biometrics appointment, and at that point you must show up with proper identifications such as a passport, driver license, military photo ID, or a state-issued photo ID.

Green Card Renewal Filing Cost

The fee for this green card renewal process comes out to a  total of $450, of which $365 goes toward the filing fee itself and $85 for the biometric fee.

When should I renew my green card?

If you are a U.S. green card holder and a permanent resident of the United States, you must renew your green card 6 months prior to its expiration date.  The same goes for your passport expiration.  The United States customs typically would not let you leave the country if the green card or passport expires within 6 months of the travel date.    So if you’re currently abroad and the 6 months target date is fast approaching, you should contact the local U.S. Consulate office as soon as possible.

How often do I need to renew my green card?

If you don’t plan to become a U.S. citizen but would like to continue the freedom to travel in and out of the United States without a vistors visa, you will have to renew your green card every 10 years.  And it’s highly recommended that you renew 6 months prior to its expiration.  Contact your local U.S. Consulate if you’re aboard and need more details.

Replace Lost or Stolen Green Card

Posted May 28th, 2011. Filed under FAQ's Green Card Advice

I misplaced or lost my green card, should I or do I have to replace it?

Most definitely. You cannot re-enter the United States if you do not have your Green Card or Premanent Residient Card with you. Make sure you apply for a new card as soon as you realize your card is lost or missing.

What form do I need to fill out to replace my Green Card?

If your green card is lost more missing, you will have to fill the form I-90 from. You can get the form from the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) by calling 1-800-870-3676 or directly from their website at
http://uscis.gov/graphics/formsfee/forms/i-90.htm

lost green card

What’s Required to apply for replacement Green Card?

First you must submit the INS the “inital evidence,” which basically proves that you are the rightful owner of a green card. What you can do is
1) submit a photocopy of your lost green card if you have one
2) if you’re replacing a damaged card, simply send back that card
3) file your application with a copy of your driver license, passport, non-driver ID card, or bith certificate. This option only applies to people over 18 years old.

Then you must mail in two passport style photos, which can be done cheaply as stores such as CVS for about $5-$10. Be sure to print your application number on the back of the photo so it’s easily identifable by the processor.

How much does it cost to replace my lost or stolen green card?

Losing your green card will cost you $365 for application fee, and then another $85 for what’s called a biometric fee, for a total of $450.

Green Card FAQ’s

Posted May 20th, 2011. Filed under FAQ's Green Card Advice

green card adviceBelow are answers to common questions from people related to a US Green Card

“I’ve heard of it but what really is a Green Card?”

Green card is basically your pass to live and work in the United States of America. It is also called Permanent Resident Card.  Once you have a Green Card, you can freely work in the USA and enjoy the rights that Native Americans enjoy.  A Green card gives you a permanent U.S resident status but it doesn’t mean you will become a U.S citizen so you can still retain your nationality.  Yet, if you like, you can apply for citizenship after having a Green card for a number of years.

“Why should I get a Green Card?”

There are many reasons why you may want to get a Green Card.  Since it gives you the right to live and work like an American citizen, you can freely work, study, and whatever things that Americans can legally do in their country.  Having a Green card is also an advantage to many business enthusiasts as it allows them to put up a business or expand their business without ay fuss.

“Am I qualified to get a Green Card?”

You can apply for a Green card if you are eligible under one of immigrant categories as provided by Immigration Nationality Act (INA); you have an immigrant visa readily available; have an approved petition immigrant (if you have a relative who petitioned you) and; admissible to the United States.

“Great, now how do I get a Green Card?”

There are 5 different ways on how you can acquire a Green card: Green card through employment-based green card referred to a eb1, eb2, and eb3 categories; Green card lottery; Green card through asylum and refugee status; and Green card through investment.

“How long does it take to get a Green Card?”

Just like any documents and paperwork, especially when you want to work abroad, Green card application process may take sometime.  It actually depends on the personal circumstances of applicants.  The Green card process begins from filing to acquiring your resident status, it may take a couple of years plus the other hassles and delay when filing and submitting requirements.  Don’t lose hope.  If your application runs smoothly, you can get your card within 3 to 6 months.

“Does Green card expires?”

Yes it does.  Once you get a Green card, you are entitled to be a US resident for 10 years.  After which, you would have to revalidate or renew your card to enjoy your privileges.